We use cookies to improve your experience on our Website. We need cookies to continually improve our services, enable certain features, and when we embed third-party services or content, such as the Vimeo video player or Twitter feeds. In such cases, information may also be transferred to third parties. By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies. We use different types of cookies. You can personalize your cookie settings here:

Show detail settings
Please find more information in our privacy statement.

There you may also change your settings later.

Respiratory infections as a risk factor for type 1 diabetes

Infections in Early Life and Development of Type 1 Diabetes. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2181. JAMA. May 3, 2016

 

DZD researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München found a further piece in the puzzle of understanding how type 1 diabetes develops. They show that viral respiratory infections during the first six months of life are associated with an increased risk for type 1 diabetes.

The scientists headed by Prof. Anette-Gabriele Ziegler examined data from almost 300,000 children born in Bavaria. Their findings show that viral respiratory tract disorders during the first six months of life significantly increase the risk of children developing type 1 diabetes. Infections that occurred later or that involved other organs were not associated with a significantly higher risk.

In the future the scientists want to determine whether there is actually a causal relationship and if yes, exactly which pathogens are involved and how they trigger this effect. This could then serve as a basis for attempting to develop an appropriate vaccine.

Original publication:
Beyerlein A, Donnachie E, Jergens S, Ziegler AG. Infections in Early Life and Development of Type 1 Diabetes. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.2181. JAMA. May 3, 2016