We use cookies to improve your experience on our Website. We need cookies to continuously improve the services, to enable certain features and when embedding services or content of third parties, such as video player. By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies. We use different types of cookies. You can personalize your cookie settings here:

Show detail settings
Please find more information in our privacy statement.

There you may also change your settings later.

News

Science instead of pillow fight - 17th Long Night of the Sciences Dresden

Jointly marveling, researching, laughing, experimenting and communicating. 39,000 visitors at 700 events in Dresden's scientific institutes, that was the Long Night of the Sciences 2019 and the Paul Langerhans Institute was, as always, right at the center with a diabetes information stand.

A wide range of activities and information on the subject of diabetes attracted numerous visitors. Source: PLID

 

Science instead of a pillow fight - this was the motto of the 17th Long Night of the Sciences, that took place on June 14th at various research institutes in Dresden. Traditionally, the Paul-Langerhans-Institute Dresden (PLID) participated again in this great event series with a multitude of activities. Between 18:00h and 1:00h more than 2000 science enthusiastic young and old guests visited the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) where the PLID information booth was located. They took the opportunity to inform themselves about current research activities on type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

The PLID's concrete offer this year included, among other things, three lectures. Prof. Dr. Barbara Ludwig spoke about "Diabetes mellitus type 1 - current therapy options and perspectives for the day after tomorrow" and Prof. Dr. Peter Schwarz advised his audience to "Run away from diabetes". The third lecture within the PLID program was entitled "Research that changes the diabetes landscape" and was given as an international contribution by Marko Barovic, a PhD student of the Institute.

In addition to the lectures, there was the opportunity to take part in a taste experiment and a "sugar quiz" at the information stand. In a self-produced video, the visitors were invited to gain insights into the intracellular processes in a beta cell after it had been exposed to a glucose stimulus or they risked a look through the microscope onto differently stained pancreatic islet sections. Last but not least, anyone who was interested could take the chance to snapshot him- or herself in complete cleanroom clothing within the PLID photobox and thus capture the 17th Long Night of Science 2019 for eternity.